Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Welcome to the Oregon Cryonics forum

jordansparks
Site Admin
Posts: 67
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:59 pm

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby jordansparks » Mon Feb 15, 2016 10:07 am

I changed the name of your post from "a new cryoprotectant" to "Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation".

Yes, it's very exciting, and clearly has profound implications for all cryonics service providers. My main hesitation is that it was an ideal scenario, and no experiments have been done yet for non-ideal scenarios. But it should be a busy few years while we debate and gather more data.

jordansparks
Site Admin
Posts: 67
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:59 pm

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby jordansparks » Mon Feb 22, 2016 1:47 pm


jonano
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2015 7:11 pm
Contact:

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby jonano » Sat Apr 02, 2016 12:36 pm

I dont know if this cryoprotectant is better for cracking and fracturing over time, because this brain of rabbit did not wait 10 years to be cryopreverserved and then be revived.

Crackings appear on long term cryopreservation.

jordansparks
Site Admin
Posts: 67
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:59 pm

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby jordansparks » Sat Apr 02, 2016 1:08 pm

Cracking happens during cooling and would be noticed immediately without waiting. So this procedure completely avoids cracking. We think, although there is still some uncertainty, that all current cryonics patients so far have undergone cracking. This includes the Alcor patients stored in Intermediate Temperature Storage (ITS).

jonano
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Aug 29, 2015 7:11 pm
Contact:

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby jonano » Mon May 16, 2016 5:00 pm

http://www.alcor.org/Library/html/Inter ... orage.html

see fig 7. I want that for me. I dance.

here there is a news:

http://www.21cm.com/news.stm

something I dont understand is that, do they cryopreserved near -196 celcius degree or more warm than 196 celcius degree ?

when they write this:

and rewarming from a temperature below the glass transition temperature of the vitrified brain.

because if they use their patent like wrote here:

http://www.alcor.org/Library/html/Inter ... orage.html

with their warmer temperature with their ITS, we will need to pay for that and it will cost more, and cryonics will be available only to rich people again, which is bad for me. Why not giving this technology to everybody, I'm sure they dont even want to sell that to Oregon Cryonics. I hope they want. Monopoly is not good for everybody.

Also they say that they are waiting for a prize of 107 000$USD for a pig brain, a massive tissue/organ, which will make another news soon.

From what I understand from Alcor is that this is not a news (this drug was discovered in 1986) and the toxicity is more present:

https://www.fightaging.org/archives/201 ... servation/



Anyway, I just hope everybody will be able to get cryonics, it would be funnier.

--Jon

lisc
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:51 pm

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby lisc » Tue Jan 16, 2018 5:34 pm

Hello Mr. Sparks,

Can you tell us if Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation is the same as the mixture M22 which is used in cryopreservation that is supposed to be less toxic and damaging to the organs and tissue in the body? The companies or company that correctly preserves people and pets so that they can possibly be reanimated one day will without a doubt go down in history as pioneers in the field of reanimation I believe. Thank you.

jordansparks
Site Admin
Posts: 67
Joined: Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:59 pm

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby jordansparks » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:01 am

I see the link above is broken. I've been more focused on developing protocols, and have eased up on trying to explain them to anyone. I just added a short explanation of toxicity to this page:
http://www.oregoncryo.com/suspendedAnimation.html
If you don't see it at first, hit refresh.

Toxicity is when chemicals injure or kill a living organism. We use formaldehyde chemical fixation, which immediately halts all biological activity. It is, by definition, toxic, but that label is meaningless in the context of attempting to preserve structure rather than viability.

lisc
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:51 pm

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby lisc » Wed Jan 17, 2018 12:20 pm

Perfecting the Cryopreservation Technique:

Of all the cryopreservation companies in the U.S. today, you seem uniquely eager and sincere in your attempts to discover the very best way to cryonically freeze the the body so that it has the absolute best chance of reanimation someday. You appear to care more about the quality of the work being performed over obtaining quantities (as in patients) before the process has been perfected. This will naturally set your organization apart from others as advances in this field are uncovered and procedures are invented which may eventually allow patients to be reanimated in the future. Wouldn't it be something if we were only 30 years away from this technology as opposed to 100?

Rib Jig
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Dec 18, 2015 7:08 pm

Re: Aldehyde Stabilized Cryopreservation

Postby Rib Jig » Sat Jun 16, 2018 6:14 am

lisc wrote:Of all the cryopreservation companies in the U.S. today...obtaining quantities (as in patients) before the process has been perfected.


Today's dying have no time to wait for perfection.
They must select from what's available.
Alcor does NO recruiting AFAICT, so "quantities" are NOT due to any sales team "obtaining" clients...


Return to “Forum”